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The Australian Government has made changes to functions overseen by the Attorney-General's Department and Department of Home Affairs. These changes involve the transfers of:

  • identity and biometrics functions into the Attorney-General's Department
  • protective security policy and government and major event security functions to the Department of Home Affairs.

National Anti-Corruption Commission

The National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) is an independent Australian Government agency that detects, investigates and reports on serious or systemic corrupt conduct in the Australian Government public sector. The NACC also educates the public service and the public about corruption risks and prevention.

The NACC commenced operations on 1 July 2023.

Please visit the NACC website for more information.

This short video explains the NACC and its work.

 

 

For more information about the NACC, refer to the links below. This content will be updated regularly with more material.

In this section...

What is the NACC?

This page provides a general overview of the new National Anti-Corruption Commission (the NACC). It includes its purpose, functions and powers under the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022 (the NACC Act).

What is corrupt conduct?

This page provides general information about corrupt conduct under the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022. It includes some examples that may help you understand the types of behaviour that the Commissioner of the National Anti-Corruption Commission may consider to be corrupt conduct.

Who can the NACC investigate?

This page provides general guidance on who the National Anti-Corruption Commission (the NACC) will be able to investigate. In particular, explaining who is considered a public official under the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022 .

Mandatory Referrals: Commonwealth agencies other than intelligence agencies

This page provides general guidance on mandatory referrals for heads of Commonwealth agencies that are not intelligence agencies. It includes obligations for agency heads under the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022 (the NACC Act). 
 

Mandatory Referrals: Commonwealth intelligence agencies

This page provides general guidance on mandatory referrals for intelligence agencies. It includes obligations for intelligence agency heads under the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022 (the NACC Act).

Mandatory referrals: Public Interest Disclosure officers

This page provides an overview of responsibilities for Public Interest Disclosure (PID) officers under the NACC Act. This section gives general information on referrals to the NACC or IGIS for instances of corrupt conduct. 

Voluntary referrals

This page provides general information about voluntary referrals and what happens when a referral is made. It includes an overview of protections for people who make a referral under the NACC Act.

How to make a referral to the NACC

This page provides general information about the process for referring an issue to the NACC. More information will be provided on the NACC website.

Information for ministers, parliamentarians and their staff

This page provides an overview for parliamentarians as agency heads of parliamentary offices. It includes a summary of mandatory referral obligations for parliamentarians.

NACC legislation

NACC legislation

On 30 November 2022, the National Anti-Corruption Commission Act 2022 and National Anti-Corruption Commission (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Act 2022 were passed by the Australian Parliament. These Acts received Royal Assent on 12 December 2022 and will commence on 1 July 2023.